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  • Ireland Part Two


    I should probably give fair warning that this is a very image heavy post, and that it's mainly of (beautiful) landscapes. Also that it might make you want to drop everything and go visit the Giant's Causeway, because boy, is it ever gorgeous.

    Brenda and I drove up with her cousin Declan and his wife Darina who were kind enough to take us on this lovely trip to Northern Ireland to see the Giant's Causeway. We stayed in a lovely little trailer in the town of Ballycastle (A town nearby to the Causeway). I wish I had more photos of the trailer because Brenda and I's bedroom was hilariously small, but it seems that most of what I have consists of this shot of my breakfast of peanut butter on toast and tea.



    That is some pretty realistic rowing of the boat, if I do say so myself :)


    If you haven't heard of the Giant's Causeway before, here is what their website says about its history:
    "60 million years ago the land here was different: the climate was warmer and vegetation thrived. Tectonic plates were moving - Europe and North America were moving apart. Magma from deep inside Earth spewed through cracks in the surface. Lava flowed. It cooled in contact with air and rock, hardening into basalt. For hundreds of thousands of years, all was relatively quiet. Then the earth cracked open again and more lava forced its way out. This time, the lava cooled slowly and evenly in a deep pool. Cracks travelled through the cooling rock, creating the columns we see stretching up..and making the honeycomb pattern we can see today. There are over 40,000 columns at the Giant's Causeway, most are six-sided, but there are others with fewer or more sides. Later eruptions left these columns hidden deep underground. It took millions of years of erosion for the columns to begin to be revealed. The sea level rose and fell and rose again. It wasn’t until after the last ice age, about 15,000 years ago, that the columns were revealed at the shore as they are today."

    The honeycomb shapes are absolutely amazing to see in person, they all fit together so perfectly! 

    After leaving the Causeway, we drove over to another fantastic spot: The Carrick-a-Rede rope bridge. The bridge takes you over to the Carrick-a-Rede island where you can walk around and take in the amazing views. The bridge was traditionally erected by salmon fishermen. There is no longer any salmon fishing done here, as there aren't many salmon left to catch.

     

    After seeing how shaky and high up this bridge was, I almost opted to wait on the safe side, but after some convincing we all made it across. And since you can't tell from the photos, I should tell you how it very rainy and windy it was that day (Didn't help with my fear of heights while crossing!)


    Taken just before the bridge actually started, otherwise how could I have looked this calm and collected?

    I will be forever dreaming about these breathtaking views.

    Probably the bravest photo I've taken so far! 

    Later on, we had a much deserved dinner at Central Wine Bar in downtown Ballycastle.

    After dinner we checked out a few of the other pubs in Ballycastle and then finished the night with some fresh chips from a local chip shop, mmm! 

    All photos taken with my Canon EOS 5D Mark II and my Canon EF 35mm f/1.4 USM lens.

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